ST PETERSBURG, FL - MAY 22: Hanley Ramirez #13 of the Boston Red Sox looks on during a game against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field on May 22, 2018 in St Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

One beauty about being a Boston sports fan there’s never a boring moment. Last week the Red Sox announced that first baseman Hanley Ramirez was designated for assignment.  With Mitch Moreland on a torrid hot streak at the plate, the team decided to go in another direction. In this post, we’ll examine three areas that contributed to the releasing of Hanley Ramirez.

Production Starting To Dwindle

In April, Ramirez was one of the hottest hitters in baseball, batting .330 with 3 home runs and 17rbi’s. Ramirez has slumped terribly in May, batting a dismal .263 with 6 homers and 12 rbi’s. With Mitch Moreland on a tear, the club decided it was time to say goodbye. If you take into account his four _years 22,000,000 dollar salary in which the team will still pay him15,000,00 this year. Not to mention that if he reaches 1,000,050 at_ bats, he will get the full 22,000,00 dollars next year.  And you know that’s not going to happen.

Lack Of Focus

Anybody who follows the Red Sox knows that the club had serious leadership issues last season. Ramirez’s goofy personality did not bode well in the new clubhouse atmosphere. Newly acquired JD Martinez does his talking with his bat. So far this season he’s on a pace to hit 50 plus home runs with 19 thus far.  Under the new regime, the Red Sox are the best team in baseball with a 39_17 record  and a first place standing in the AL East. In all fairness, it made sense to release him.

Team Still Has Enough Power

In three years Ramirez’s best year was in 2016 which happened to be David Ortiz‘s last season. With the arrival of JD Martinez and MVP candidate Mookie Betts the organization finds themselves tied with the Yankees for the most home runs.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  There are some critics who feel letting Ramirez go was a  huge mistake. If you factor in his 380 playoff average as a Red Sox plus his 45o OBP only time will tell. If they stay on their current pace, then the second half should be very interesting

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